Monthly Wrap Up

March Wrap Up

I’m still processing the fact that we are in April. How did that happen? 😀

March went by so quickly. I worked longer hours, went outside with my dog more often and didn’t feel like reading a lot.

I also went to the Czech Republic to see my family and then escaped it all whilst visiting a mountain cottage with my boyfriend in Snowdonia, Wales.

This was our morning view:

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No internet, no central heating, nothing luxurious… just a simple retreat in nature that recharged me after long working weeks. I learned that I love the board game Scrabble. And that Google is overrated… 😉

My critical self wanted to immediately start apologising that I ‘only’ read four books in March and that I haven’t been writing that much or commenting on other blogs recently.

Then I reminded myself why I started this blog and why I want to write this blog.

You see, one of my core values is Creativity.

It’s this wonderfully playful need to make something that keeps me content and brings me a lot of joy.

All those creative souls out there know that creativity is a process and sometimes, doesn’t happen on a whim.

On certain days, I can stare at my blank screen screaming as words just don’t want to come out. Then there are days when I could write for hours.

March was the month of the ‘I don’t feel it’ and ‘even if I feel like it, I can’t write about it’ themes. And that’s OK. 😊

I reflected a lot, connected with a lot of people face to face, day dreamed for hours as I didn’t want to read.. I’m sure you are getting the picture… 😉

I am desperately itching to write and read again. And I am so happy you are here with me. 😊

After a lengthy intro, let’s have a look at March reads, shall we:

  • The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan, 3 stars

Slightly disturbing crime debut set in Irish Galway. I read it during St. Patrick’s day and it was a fairly fast paced and enjoyable read.

My full review can be found here.

  • Sticks and Stones by Jo Jakeman, 4 stars

Another crime read. This one was about head games, revenge and explored how we can forgive.

My review can be found here.

  • What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty, 4 stars

March was the month when I discovered Liane Moriarty. 🙂 I thoroughly enjoyed the concept of amnesia / time travel whilst reading What Alice Forgot. Thanks Norrie for introducing me to this wonderful writer! 🙂

My review can be also found here.

  • Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty, 5 stars

Yep, definitely the book of March. Wholly cow, I loved this book. I am still organising my scattered thoughts but its full review will be coming up shortly.

It’s a book about friendship but is also very heavy on shame. My favourite psychological topic. Please stay tuned for this one. 🙂


So that’s March in a nutshell.

Now over to you my friends.

What was your favourite March book?

Mystery

The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan

ruin

Let’s get the summary of the book from GoodReads first:

It’s been twenty years since Cormac Reilly discovered the body of Hilaria Blake in her crumbling Georgian home. But he’s never forgotten the two children she left behind…

When Aisling Conroy’s boyfriend Jack is found in the freezing black waters of the river Corrib, the police tell her it was suicide. A surgical resident, she throws herself into study and work, trying to forget – until Jack’s sister Maude shows up. Maude suspects foul play, and she is determined to prove it.

DI Cormac Reilly is the detective assigned with the re-investigation of an ‘accidental’ overdose twenty years ago – of Jack and Maude’s drug- and alcohol-addled mother. Cormac is under increasing pressure to charge Maude for murder when his colleague Danny uncovers a piece of evidence that will change everything…

This unsettling crime debut draws us deep into the dark heart of Ireland and asks who will protect you when the authorities can’t – or won’t. Perfect for fans of Tana French and Jane Casey.

For starters I honestly think McTiernan did a fabulous job given that The Ruin was first novel. It is a well written story that makes you experience rainy Irish Galway. I timed reading the book in line with St. Patrick’s day and I must admit it was a pretty atmospheric read. 🙂

The story is predominantly told from three perspectives:

Cormac Reilly, a maverick detective struggling to settle in his new role after his transfer from Dublin to Galway.

Aisling Conroy, a hard-working medical professional, whose life turned into a nightmare just after St Patrick’s day

Maude Blake, a long-lost sister who is back in Ireland and who also wants some answers.

I am a little tired of stories of corrupted police and maverick detectives having to trust no one a few chosen ones to find truth. The fact that the story centred a lot around police’s politics was not my thing but some may enjoy that. I personally would prefer more of the crime / character development.

Unfortunately I could not connect or relate to those characters. It could have been me. I personally wanted to engage more with the characters and know more of them. There were many hints on things in the past that slightly frustrated me and again, I felt I wanted to have slightly clearer picture rather than second guessing.

With that said, it was still an alright story to read and I finished the book. There was a lot going on, the pace was fairly fast, the language was ‘to the point’, several cases got intertwined and a few twists took place.

Potential triggers: domestic abuse, child abuse

** I received an ARC from Little, Brown Book Group in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for the opportunity **

Verdict: Hot Beverage on Apple Hot Beverage on Apple Hot Beverage on Apple 3/5